Photo of the Month by Harold Dobberpuhl
Harold Dobberpuhl became interested in news and commercial photography while a sophomore at Messmer High School in Milwaukee. He was one of two staff photographers assigned to take pictures for the school newspaper and school annual. While in high school, he received several awards for pictures entered in the National High School Photographic Awards contest.

His first newspaper picture was published in August of 1947. Between then and January of 1964, thousands of his pictures were published in the Ozaukee Press, News Graphic, Milwaukee Journal, Milwaukee Sentinel and several other publications.

The highlight of the newspaper photography endeavor was to win first place in the pictorial category of the 1956 photo contest of the Wisconsin Press Photographer's Association. Most of the entries in this contest were from photographers working for the various major daily newspapers in the state.

His professional career as a photographer ended when he became County Clerk of Ozaukee County in January of 1964. Occasionally, he still takes a picture that is published in a local newspaper. The greatest photography accomplishment was two one-man shows at the Cedarburg Cultural Center. About 180 of the show pictures were then published in a book released in 1995. These were pictures of scenes and activities in Cedarburg from 1946 to 1964. The book is named CEDARBURG 1946 - 1964 PHOTOGRAPHS BY HAROLD C. DOBBERPUHL. He received the 1996 State Historical Society "Local History Award of Merit" because of his publication of this book.

In the early days of his photo career, he entered pictures in the annual Ozaukee County Art Show. He resumed this practice about 15 years ago and has received a significant number of blue ribbons since then. This show presents an annual challenge to take a quality photo for exhibition in the next year's show. His travels have presented numerous photo opportunities.

The idea of using photos of the various historic structures in Ozaukee County presented another challenge for him.

Ed. Note:  Harold provided photo's of the month to this site from April 1998 to July 2001.

See Harold Dobberpuhl for more information about him.

Past Monthly Photos (In alphabetical order- click photo to link to page)

Cedarburg's Old Firehouse -  The term "old" is used because this building was replaced by the present firehouse in November of 1964. This building was constructed in 1908 to replace the ...
Cedarburg Mill Cedarburg Mill - The Cedarburg Mill was built by Cedarburg founders Frederick Hilgen and William Schroeder in 1855 at a cost of $22,000 and was considered one of the finest mills in the midwest. 
Old Cedarburg Depot - Now located in Pioneer Village Cedarburg Railroad Depot - The Milwaukee & Northern Railway, which became a part of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific system, built a railroad from Milwaukee to Cedarburg. ...
CedarburgWoolenMill1.jpg (164496 bytes) Cedarburg Woolen Mill/Cedar Creek Settlement - The Cedarburg Woolen Mill, which later became the Wittenberg Woolen Mill, was founded by Frederick Hilgen, who also was a partner in...
Christmas Past - Cedarburg 1956 Christmas Past - is a scene of downtown Cedarburg in 1956. The picture was originally published in the Cedarburg News....
The Eagle Still Flies - ...Because a crane was needed to paint the tower area, it was suggested that the eagle on the top of the tower also be repainted...
Hamilton Turnhalle - The last remaining turner hall of its type in the United States, it served as a combination meeting place and gymnasium for members of the Hamilton "Turnverein"...
Hilgen-Wittemberg Dam - Some time ago, the Waubeka Dam was featured on the County Web Site and it was indicated that other County Dams would be featured over time.

History of the Coverd Bridge - More than 40 covered bridges once dotted the Wisconsin countryside. Today the sole survivor is the Cedarburg bridge, originally known as the "Red Bridge",...
Grafton Woolen Mill - A woolen mill was built in Cedarburg in 1865 by Frederick Hilgen, Dietrich Wittenberg and Joseph Trottman. In 1872, the mill operation was incorporated as the ...
Japanese Tea House Japanese Tea House - The featured building this month is the one with the red roof. It portrays architecture that is no comparison with the adjacent old stone Hilgen and Schroeder mill that that ..
Lime Kilns Lime Kilns - These structures are now a part of Lime Kiln Park in Grafton. The park area was once part of a limestone quarry operated by the Milwaukee Falls Lime Company, which was incorporated in ...
Lighthouse - Lighthouses are fascinating structures and they become more fascinating when they are easily assessable. The Port Washington lighthouse is one that is easily assessable, but it does take ...
Milwaukee Northern Interurban had start in Cedarburg -ONE OF THREE FOUNDERS BECAME OZAUKEE COUNTY JUDGE - The Milwaukee Northern Railway was...
Octagon Barns - This octagon shaped barn in the Town of Grafton is now owned bv the Tetzlaff family, but is was erected by Ernest Clausing 100 years ago. It is believed that Clausing erected... 
Old Firehouse - Port Washington - This one-story Fire Engine House was built in 1928 on the same site as the previous wood frame engine house, which it replaced....
Ozaukee County Courthouses - In September, the web page featured a portion of the historic courthouse. That portion consisted of part of the tower, one of the clock faces and the eagle mounted...
Snow fun in Ozaukee County -Ozaukee County has received a fare amount of snow so far this winter, but most of it has fallen at times that are not conducive to outdoor recreation. 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
Steel Truss Bridge - Annexations have moved the east limits of the Village of Saukville a great distance from this bridge, but the bridge still serves as the gateway to "downtown" Saukville ...

Click the to link to the photo and story

Smith Bros Fish Shanty - Commercial fishing once was an important business in Port Washington. There were five such operations. Each had a fishing shack and a boat. Recently three of the shacks ...
St Francis' - The hill on the south end of the downtown business area in Cedarburg is not as high as the bluff at the north end of the downtown business area in Port Washington, but both high areas ...
St John's - St. John's Church was organized in 1866, When the property was purchased, there was a building on the site that housed a tavern (one with a slight reputation). One floor was used for ...
St Mary's Hill - Franklin Street in downtown Port Washington has several buildings with interesting features, but the highlight of this street scene is St. Mary's Catholic Church, which is located on a ...
Stoney Hill Schoolhouse (Flag Day) - Over three quarters of a century ago, a 19 year old, $40 a month school-teacher, stirred by a deep love of the American Flag, held the first Flag Day exercises ...
Street Clocks & Awnings - The current Armbruster Jewelry store in Cedarburg was built in 1907. The building, inside and outside, still looks about the same as when it was built.
Thiensville Village Hall & F.D. - Engraved in the stone work above the two front windows of this rather strange looking structure in downtown Thiensville are the words "Thiensville Village Hall & F.D.". 
Trinty Evangical Lutheran Church - Friestadt - The oldest Lutheran church in Wisconsin will celebrate its 160th anniversary during October. As part of this celebration, the church has made...
Waubeka Dam saved from Demolition Waubeka area residents have been successful in at least postponing demolition (technically breaching) of their dam on the Milwaukee River.
Wisconsin tall ship sailed to Port Washington During the 19th century, schooners or tall ships were a common site as they haled freight and passengers to Port Washington ...
Yankee Settlers Cottage - 1839 - The early settlers who came to the Mequon area in the 1830's were Yankees from New York state and English, followed by Germans and Irish. 
 
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